"...like playing for a jar of pickles and trying to turn them back into cucumbers.”

About Caleb

Caleb Miles is a guitarist and singer-songwriter based in the Annapolis Valley of Nova Scotia. He performs solo and with The Hupman Brothers Band. He also plays drums for indie-rockers Dayliner.

Caleb joined his first rock’n’roll band at the age of fifteen in Albuquerque, New Mexico. There he performed in various original outfits (including The Illegal Aliens and A Murder Of Crows) throughout the 80s and early 90s, moving briefly to Lexington, Kentucky before settling in Portland, Oregon in 1996. Working in record stores by day and playing in bands by night, Caleb pursued his musical education by digging into the folk and blues roots of rock’n’roll and applying what he heard to his playing and songwriting.

Upon moving to Nova Scotia in 2005, Caleb produced a string of albums that blend these roots with a distinct late 60s-early 70s vibe, playing all the instruments himself and forging an eclectic range of styles. His most recent cd Dividing Lines runs the gamut from acoustic folk-pop to electric gutbucket blues, a Hawaiian slack-key instrumental and a piece based primarily on Middle Eastern percussion. His rich musical tastes enable him to perform old blues and country, dive into a Buddy Holly tune or a Led Zeppelin-Frank Zappa medley, while sprinkling original tunes throughout. Caleb has also produced cds for many local artists including Dayliner, Mark Bezanson, James Stevenson and Jamie Junger.

Caleb has opened for Harry Manx, Ron Hynes, Thom Swift, Corb Lund, Stephen Fearing and Erin Costello, and with The Hupman Brothers Band won the 2010 ECMA for Best Blues Recording and 2011 Music Nova Scotia Best Blues Album, as well as twice playing the Dutch Mason Blues Fest (opening for Robert Cray and The Sheepdogs) and sharing stages with Charles Bradley, Garrett Mason, and Matt Andersen.

Caleb is an Aries, enjoys winter more than summer, and writes most of his songs while mowing the lawn or stacking firewood. He loves coffee, beer, and Mexican food, as well as discovering obscure and commercially overlooked musical artists from the 50s, 60s, and 70s. He hates mosquitos, humidity, and writing bios.